District 10 Como Community Council

Environment

Environment

Posts related to the D10 Como Park Environment Committee

Como Tree Trek This Weekend (6/26/21)

Mark your calendar for the District 10 Environment Committee’s 2021 Tree Trek. This walking tour will be led by Minnesota Master Naturalist Stephanie Mirocha. She will provide fascinating facts, uses, and histories of many of the diverse tree species in the park.

Como Woodland June Open House

Come join us for the Como Woodland June Open House on Saturday, June 12, 9:30AM to 11:30AM.
Meet us at the Kilmer Fireplace to start your walk through the Como Woodland Outdoor Classroom (SW Como Park), 1221 Wynne Ave., Saint Paul, MN.

Recorded Presentation: Jumping Worms- April 14, 2021

In a presentation to District 10’s Environment Committee, Ryan Hueffmeier, a researcher in the University of Minnesota’s Jumping Worm’s Project, explains the threats jumping worms pose to Minnesota gardens, forests, and soils; how to find jumping worms; how to distinguish them from other earthworms; what to do if you do find them; how to prevent them from spreading; and how to report them to researchers. Here is additional information from the U of M Extension on precautions to take when swapping plants, and advice on identifying and eliminating jumping worms from your property. (April 14, 2021)

What They Meant to Say About Food Scraps

Upon further review, Ramsey County has changed its mind on what is acceptable at food scraps recycling sites, including at the District 10 community site on Beulah Lane in Como Park. After briefly banning pizza boxes, paper egg cartons, and “food-stained” paper bags, the county now says those items are again OK. So are certified compostable products (such as plates, bowls, cups, and utensils), as long as they have a “Compostable” logo from the Biodegradable Products Institute (BPI) or Compost Manufacturing Alliance.

Proof: Como Lake Water Quality is Getting Better

The herbicide that Capitol Region Watershed District used in 2020 to battle invasive curly-leaf pondweed, and the alum it used to battle excessive phosphorus, both are showing The herbicide that Capitol Region Watershed District used in 2020 to battle invasive curly-leaf pondweed in Como Lake, and the alum it used to battle excessive phosphorus, both are showing amazing early results in improving water quality.

Como Lake Gets Double Dose of Treatment

Capitol Region Watershed District plans to inject aluminum sulfate into Como Lake to slash phosphorus loads and improve water quality in Como Lake. It’s high phosphorus levels — three times the state standard — that lead to algae blooms that suffocate the lake. Low oxygen leads to fish kills, strong odors, and green water.